Category Archives: graduate students

Feb. 24: Clear Thinking Made Visual

February 24, 2015, 5-6:30 PM
Baker Hall 235B
The PCR Team

presentation2With every figure, slide, and talk, we are building a scientific case – perhaps for the existence of a particle, for the necessity of a policy, or simply for the validity of a control. Yet many of our common practices in presenting information actually obscure the case we’re making. In this workshop (designed for the AAAS 2015 conference), we will discuss fundamental principles for structuring information that apply at all scales, from the lone data figure to the entire talk. Attendees will learn how to apply principles of attention and visual design to turn presentations into what Edward Tufte calls “clear thinking made visible.”

This is the second in a three-part series on preparing strong presentations for audiences outside your field.

Register here.

CMU’s Public Communication for Researchers is a professional development program to teach communication skills to graduate students in fields of research. The goal of PCR is to help participants learn and practice communicating science to people of any background. “We just want to feel comfortable talking about our work to the media, the voting public, and our grandmothers.”

 

 

Mar. 24: The Presentation Games

presentation3March 24, 2015
Scaife Hall 214 (tentative)
Tony Eng (MIT)

This is the third in PCR’s 3-part series on preparing strong presentations for audiences outside your field.

Workshop 1: Being in the Moment
4-5:30 PM 

One of the most difficult aspects of live presentations is focusing on the audience and not on your content or your delivery. In this workshop, we’ll try to get you out of your head and into the moment by playing some games, many of which come from improvisational theater.

Workshop 2: Delivery
5:45-7:15 PM

Good delivery consists largely of getting rid of habits, but sometimes we aren’t even aware of what our habits are. In this workshop, we’ll help you identify an area to improve and to find ways to make your delivery more effective.

Register for either or both of the workshops here.


CMU’s Public Communication for Researchers is a professional development program to teach communication skills to graduate students in fields of research. The goal of PCR is to help participants learn and practice communicating science to people of any background. “We just want to feel comfortable talking about our work to the media, the voting public, and our grandmothers.”

Help 4 3MT @ GCC

GCCinteraction1Have you signed up for the Three Minute Thesis challenge, to engage an audience and communicate your PhD thesis research in just 3 minutes? The GCC in Hunt Library has your back!

Watch our video on creating a successful 3MT presentation (also available on our Handouts and Resources page, under “Online Video Series”). Make a tutoring appointment to get communication tips and help creating your slide, or to practice delivering your presentation in our private conference room.

Learn all about 3MT. Qualifying rounds for 3MT@CMU will be scheduled during February and March in Posner Center. The final championship round is set for April 7, 2015, in Rashid Auditorium. All rounds are open for anyone to attend.

From our friends in the Global Communication Center

GCC logoThe Global Communication Center (GCC) located in Hunt Library supports the Carnegie Mellon University community by providing advice to help plan and develop strong written, oral, and visual communication projects.

Highly trained GCC tutors can help with any academic communication task, including course papers, lab reports, presentations, scientific posters, dissertation or grant proposals, journal articles, emails to advisors or potential employers, and application materials.

Schedule Appointments

CMU students can schedule up to 15 free appointments per semesterOff-campus students who are unable to come to the library for face-to-face appointments now have an option to request etutoring appointments. Students using the email service will be sent a screen-capture video containing a tutor’s feedback within 24 hours of their appointment time. Email appointments are available on Sundays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays.

Register for Grammar Groups

These informal groups meet every two weeks to discuss specific types of sentences and writing situations that typically cause difficulty for non-native English speakers. You must be a current Carnegie Mellon student to attend.  Registration ends the day before the meeting.

InCites

tr_logo_twitter_whtNew database: InCites

Thomson Reuters’ InCites is a customized, citation-based research evaluation tool on the Web that enables you to analyze institutional productivity and benchmark your output against peers worldwide.

“Academic Idols” crowned

Watch the finalists perform!

Four Ph.D. candidates were crowned “Academic Idols” at Carnegie Mellon’s 2014 Three Minute Thesis Championship round on Feb. 18.

Rollinson

The first-place winner was David Rollinson (Robotics Institute, SCS), who presented his thesis “Snake Robots in the Wild!”

Second place went to Suchitra Ramachandran (Biological Sciences, MCS), who presented “The Brain as a Statistician. ”

Third place went to Patrick Foley (Statistics, DC) and his thesis “Statistics and the Human Connectome.”

In an audience vote, Ramachandran and Arun Shrivats (Biomedical Engineering, CIT) with the thesis “siRNA Therapeutics for Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva” tied for the People’s Choice Award.

Eleven Ph.D. candidates made it to the final round out of 140 initial registrants. The competition, brought to CMU by Dean of Libraries Keith Webster, challenged the doctoral students to present their thesis in three minutes or less in language understandable to a general audience.

Check out the CMU home page story: Academic Idol.

Read more about the competition.

Three Minute Thesis – Championship Lineup!

front of inviteEleven Ph.D. candidates competed for top honors  in CMU’s 2014 3MT Championship on Tuesday, Feb 18, in McConomy Auditorium, UC.

Watch the finalists perform in the Championship!

  • Amy Dale, Engineering & Public Policy/Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • Patrick Foley, Statistics
  • Clare Mahoney, Materials Science & Engineering
  • Eric VanEpps, Social & Decision Sciences
  • June Zhang, Electrical & Computer Engineering
  • Ardon Shorr, Biological Sciences
  • David Rollinson, Robotics Institute
  • Arun Shrivats, Biomedical Engineering
  • Aaron Wise, Computational Biology
  • Suchitra Ramachandran, Biological Sciences
  • Derry Tanti Wijaya, Language Technologies Institute

More about 3MT competition

Three Minute Thesis is sponsored by the University Libraries.